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Idaho Council for the Deaf   

and Hard of Hearing   

Resources for Deaf-Blind Individuals

This page is designed to be a resource to people with hearing and vision loss. 

What is Deaf-Blindness?

The term “individual who is deaf-blind” means any individual –

Who has a central visual acuity of 20/200 or less in the better eye with corrective lenses, or a field defect such that the peripheral diameter of visual field subtends an angular distance no greater than 20 degrees, or a progressive visual loss having a prognosis leading to one or both these conditions;  (ii) who has a chronic hearing impairment so severe that most speech cannot be understood with optimum amplification, or a progressive hearing loss having a prognosis leading to this condition; and (iii) for whom the combination of impairments described in clauses (i) and (ii) cause extreme difficulty in attaining independence in daily life activities, achieving psychosocial adjustment, or obtaining a vocation;

Who despite the inability to be measured accurately for hearing and vision loss due to cognitive or behavioral constraints, or both, can be determined through functional and performance assessment to have severe hearing and visual disabilities that cause extreme difficulty in attaining independence in daily life activities, achieving psychosocial adjustment, or obtaining vocational objectives; or

Meets such other requirements as the Secretary may prescribe in regulation; and the term “Secretary” means the Secretary of Education.  (Source: Helen Keller National Center Act, amended 1/7/93)

How Common is Hearing and Vision Loss in Idaho?

Based on Idaho population census for the year 2000, there were: 1,293,953 people counted. 

Using the formula from Wolf, Schien and Delk, 1982, 100,000/1,293,953 (13) x 346 = 4,498 individuals that have a combined hearing and vision loss, all ages.  Some may also have additional disabilities.  (Source: HKNC, Dorothy Walt)

Where Can I Find Assistive Adaptive Equipment?

For a list of adaptive technologies, click here.

Where Can I Find More Local Information?

Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults (HKNC)

The mission of HKNC is to enable each person who is deaf-blind to live and work in his or her community of choice.

Dorothy Walt, Northwest HKNC Regional Representative
1620 18th Ave. ste. 201
Seattle, Wa. 98122
(206) 324-1133 (tty)
(206) 324-9159 (fax)

Idaho Project for Children and Youth with Deaf-Blindness

The purpose of the Idaho Project for Children and Youth with Deaf-Blindness is to enhance the educational services provided to children and youth, birth through 21 years, with vision and hearing impairments.

Robin Greenfield, Project Director
Center on Disabilities & Human Development
University of Idaho
322 E. Front St. Suite 440
Boise, ID 83712
(208) 364-4012 (v/tty)
(208) 364-4035 (fax)

Idaho Assistive Technology Project

The goal of the Idaho Assistive Technology Project is to help Idahoans with disabilities acquire the assistive technology they need to live more independent lives.

Janice Carson, Project Director
Center on Disabilities & Human Development
University of Idaho
121 West Sweet Ave.
Moscow, ID 83843
(208) 885-0697
(800) 432-8324 (phone)
(208) 885-6145 (fax)

Idaho Deaf-Blind Equipment Distribution Project

The goal of this program is to ensure that low-income individuals who have combined hearing and vision loss can access telephone, advanced communications and information services.

Janice Carson, Project Director
Center on Disabilities & Human Development
University of Idaho
121 West Sweet Ave.
Moscow, ID 83712
(208) 885-0697
(800) 432-8324 (phone)
(208) 885-6145 (fax)

Graphic Design by Round the Bend Wizards

 Idaho Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing © 2011

1720 Westgate Dr., Suite A2, Boise, ID 83704

208-334-0879 V · 208-473-2122 VP/V · 208-334-0952 Fax

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